COLESLAW

Coleslaw

After my vegetarian borscht which, by the way, tastes even better when reheated the next day, I was left with large piece of white cabbage. And being a frugal gal as I am, I hate wasting food, so I quickly chopped up some more veggies to make a coleslaw.

Coleslaw

Traditional coleslaw is just four ingredients: cabbage, carrots, red onion and a mayonnaise dressing. It goes well with barbecued meat or as a side dish you’d typically bring along for a picnic. Yes, I’m aware this isn’t the time of the year for barbecues or picnics, but I thought this ‘salad’ could accompany my zucchini fritters for a weekday dinner. I put salad in parentheses because I’m aware coleslaw is not the healthiest of choices. Sad but true, mayonnaise is a rather heavy dressing so coleslaw ends up pretty filling compared to those light, leafy green salads. But if you make your own mayo you’ve avoided all the additives in industrial mayonnaise and are left with only an egg yolk, mustard and well, yes, loads of olive oil in your dressing.

Coleslaw

To give my coleslaw a kick I added some fennel, apples, pumpkin and pomegranate seeds and lots of fresh parsley. You might want to experiment by adding some celery or capers and why not make it more colorful by adding purple cabbage, red or orange bell peppers, really, anything crunchy to be enveloped by your creamy, home-made mayo. You’ll find coleslaw categorized under side dishes in my recipe index as I really think this is nourishing enough to replace potatoes with your grilled lamb or steak or fried fish. If you’re predominantly plant-based this is a nice addition to your winter salads. In any case, by making your own coleslaw and ditching the soggy, store-bought version you end up with a very fresh and crunchy winter dish!

Coleslaw

What you’ll need to serve 4:

  • 400 g white cabbage, core removed, thin outer layers peeled off
  • 2 carrots, peeled
  • half a fennel bulb, cleaned
  • 1 small red apple, cleaned
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • a few dollops of mayonnaise
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • Himalaya salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • a bunch of fresh parsley, roughly chopped

For the mayo:

  • 1 organic egg yolk
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • about 250ml of olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • Himalaya salt and freshly ground black pepper

Homemade mayonnaise for coleslaw

What you’ll need to do:

  1. Remove the tough core of the cabbage, discard the thin outer layers and using a very sharp knife, a mandolin or a food processor with its slicing or shredding blade, slice cabbage as finely as possible.
  2. For the peeled carrots, use again a very sharp knife to cut into matchsticks or use your mandolin or food processor to cut into thin pieces. Cut the apple and fennel into thin matchsticks as well.
  3. Mix shredded cabbage, carrots, fennel and apple in a salad bowl.
  4. Mix in your mayonnaise the lemon juice, sugar, mustard and season with salt and pepper. Pour the dressing over your shredded vegetables, tossing gently to make sure the vegetables are evenly coated. Add the chopped parsley, pumpkin and pomegranate seeds, taste and correct with more lemon juice, salt or pepper if needed. Let the coleslaw chill in the fridge at least an hour before serving to allow flavors to blend. Try to eat coleslaw the same day as made otherwise it ends up soggy. You can refrigerate your mayonnaise for a couple of days and chop up veggies freshly the day coleslaw would be served.
  5. To make your own mayonnaise, whisk together the egg yolk and the mustard. Whisking continuously, add the olive oil drop by drop. Really slowly, literally drop by drop. Only start adding the olive oil a little faster once the mayo has caught on. Continue whisking as you now let the olive oil gently dribble in your mixture. You can use a food processor of course to make your life easier, as you see on the photo I used a hand-held whisk and that works just fine as well. Finally, add lemon juice, salt and pepper and refrigerate immediately.

Coleslaw

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